Archive for category Temple

Who is the Preborn Christ?

This ministry is committed to developing and promoting devotion to the Preborn Christ and it begins with answering the question:  Who is the Preborn Christ?

 

In obvious terms, the Preborn Christ is Jesus during His nine months in the womb of His mother, Mary.  This time in the womb is often related to His Incarnation as a whole.  Yet the experience Jesus had within the womb is not pondered as the intimate source for prayer and meditation that it truly is.  As scripture concurs, with the account of “The Visitation (when Mary went to visit her cousin, Elizabeth), we are told that Elizabeth’s baby, St. John the Baptist, acknowledged Him and “leapt with joy.”

 

Also, in order to explore more deeply whom the Preborn Christ is, we must consider the Sacrament of Baptism – both its purpose and effect.  Sin has orphaned us and death will orphan many of us.  It is through Baptism that we are adopted by God as our Father.    This adoption also makes us brothers and sisters of Jesus and of each other.  This is emphasized by Jesus when He instructed us to pray to God as He does, “Our Father, who art in heaven….”

 

However, Christ does not stop there.  As temples of the Holy Spirit not built by human hands, Jesus has sent us His Holy Spirit to reside within us. We are bound together with the same spirit, and as the many we form a single body of Christ.  Jesus is Christ’s head and we are Christ’s body.  We, the body of Christ, share in the divine life of Jesus and the Holy Trinity, and in the tri-fold mission of Jesus as priest, prophet, and king.  If we live and die in the Lord, then we are co-heirs of the Kingdom as the body of Christ with Jesus as our head.  It is through His people, living The Way that the Incarnation of Christ is on-going.

Who is the Preborn Christ?

He is Jesus and us.  As Caryll Houselander cites in The Wood of the Cradle, Wood of the Cross, it is the salvation of each of us for we are each destined to be ‘another Christ’ in this world.  Houselander continues, “Jesus is not content in living a human life, He lives every human life.”  His call for each of us to be ‘another Christ’ in this world is what He meant in His Great Commission, “…make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.“Matthew 28:19

Man Becomes Temple and Body

The Crucifixion of Jesus Christ is well documented in the Bible, many events recorded can become lost despite their extraordinary importance to Christ’s action and message.  One finds one such an occurrence described in all three of the synoptic Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, the tearing of the temple veil.[1]

 

The veil the three refer to is the veil within the Holy of Holies of the Temple.  The Holy of Holies was the holiest space within the Temple and contained the  Ark of the Covenant that held the two sets of tablets upon which the Ten Commandments were written, Aaron’s rod, a jar of Massa and a copy of the Torah.  With heavy, tall veils, the Holy of Holies was separated from the rest of the Temple.  Comprised of two chambers, one chamber preceded the final chamber containing the Ark.  Only the high priest of the year could enter the Holy of Holies and only on the Day of Atonement.  It is in the Holy of Holies that the Priest would offer sacrifice for the sins of the community committed over the previous year.  It is in the Holy of Holies that Zechariah learned that his elderly wife would conceive a child, John the Baptist.  It was also where Zechariah expressed doubt that his elderly wife could conceive.   In answer to his doubt, Zechariah then lost his voice until John the Baptist was born and Presented in the Temple when he was named as John.

 

No other place equaled the Holy of Holies in holiness.  This space received the greatest of reverence by the Jewish people.   Just of the Ark alone, a soldier of David’s died instantly upon an unauthorized touching of the Ark when he made the effort to prevent the Ark’s fall to the ground.  There was simply no place that received such high reverence as the Holy of Holies.

 

It is with such an understanding that we can begin to recognize the sense of alarm and maybe even scandal that this veil of the Holy of Holies tore by itself from top to bottom at the same time that Jesus, the condemned blasphemer, died.

 

Some scholars have suggested that this tearing of the veil was an omen of the Temple’s destruction by the Romans in 60 AD.  Rev. Charles Emmanuel McCarthy, a Melkite priest of the Catholic Church, espouses that the torn veil is God’s manner of opening the graces of the Holy of Holies to the whole world.  It serves a s a symbol that the Temple is no longer needed as God is and Man are now reconciled.  Man, each man and woman, are each now Temple to Our Lord.  The Holy Spirit and Jesus want to dwell within each man and woman and for each to share in the body and divine life of God.  We are each Temple who can carry God within and through His Way we serve as members of Christ’s body with Jesus as our head.

 

Rev. McCarthy cites further that such an understanding makes it very clear that each human person, as Temple of the Lord and as member of the Body of Christ, is due at least as much reverence as the Holy of Holies received.  Any spiritual, verbal or physical attack on another person is desecration of God’s Temple and must be taken as that serious.



T  Matthew 27:51;  Mark 15:38; and Luke 23:45

 

Feast of St. John the Baptist

“He must increase; I must decrease,” John 3:30 was declared by John the Baptist during his final testimony before his incarceration and later beheading. Contained within these words is a clear expectation that the role of John the Baptist was to lessen while Jesus stepped forward to center stage. This is exactly what happened, especially so with his imprisonment and beheading. John the Baptist is recognized as the dividing line between the Old and New Testaments and here gives clear testimony to the fulfillment of the Old Law in Jesus Christ. He, like the Law, would recede and give way to the Spirit’s dominance.

It is also intriguing to note where the Evangelist John placed this statement of John the Baptist. Leading up to this statement of John the Baptist, the Evangelist records the Baptism of Jesus, the selection of His first Disciples, His attendance and miracle at the Wedding of Cana, the Cleansing of the Temple and the conversation between Nicodemus and Jesus on the spiritual re-birth in Christ. In parallel, we are called to seek union with the Holy Spirit that we may conceive of Christ, be cleansed for growth, and be formed into Christ in order to birth or manifest Him in this world and birth ourselves into eternal life with Jesus.

Let’s not be afraid or neglectful in asking St. John the Baptist to intercede for our reception of the Preborn Christ who has the power to change our lives and teach us how to love another.

Pleae Note: I have had technical issues with the site for the past two days and have finally resolved them. This is why, not wanting to miss noting on of John the Baptist’s contribution to the Preborn Christ devotion, this was posted late

Who is the Preborn Christ?

First of a Three-Part Series

This ministry is committed to developing and promoting devotion to the Preborn Christ and it begins with answering the question: Who is the Preborn Christ?

In obvious terms, the Preborn Christ is Jesus during His nine months in the womb of His mother, Mary. This time in the womb, is often related to His Incarnation as a whole. Yet the experience Jesus had within the womb is not often pondered as the intimate source for prayer and meditation that it truly is. As scripture concurs, with the account of “The Visitation” (when Mary went to visit her cousin, Elizabeth), we are told that Elizabeth’s baby, St. John the Baptist, acknowledged Him and “leapt with joy” within the womb.

Also, in order to explore more deeply who the Preborn Christ is, we must consider the Sacrament of Baptism – both its purpose and effect. Sin has orphaned us and death will orphan many of us. It is through Baptism that we are adopted by God as our Father. This adoption also makes us brothers and sisters of Jesus and of each other. This is emphasized by Jesus when He instructed us to pray to God as He does, “Our Father, who art in heaven….”

However, Christ does not stop there. As temples of the Holy Spirit not built by human hands, Jesus has sent us His Holy Spirit to reside within us. We are bound together with this same Spirit and the many of us form a single body of Christ. Jesus is Christ’s head and we are Christ’s body. We, the body of Christ, share in the divine life of Jesus and the Holy Trinity, and in the tri-fold mission of Jesus as priest, prophet, and king. If we live and die in the Lord, then we are co-heirs of the Kingdom as the body of Christ with Jesus as our head. It is through His people, living The Way, that the Incarnation of Christ is on-going.